BIO 102 (4 credits)

Fundamentals of Biology

Emphasizes important biological concepts and principles common to all living organisms. Topics include the cell, energetics, genetics, physiology, evolution, and ecology. Integrates laboratory and classroom work. Fulfills lab science requirement for nonscience majors. Cannot take BIO 102 and BIO 103 for credit.

BIO 103 (4 credits)

Principles of Biology

Provides a survey of important biological concepts and principles to all living organisms. Topics include prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, energetic, comparative physiology, evolution and ecology. Integrates laboratory and classroom work. This course is limited to science majors, biology minors, and biology-secondary education majors.

BIO 104 (4 credits)

Zoology

Investigative survey of life processes common in animals. Gas exchange, internal transport, nervous and endocrine control, reproduction, and homeostatic mechanisms are major topics included. Integrates laboratory and classroom work. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 107 (3 credits)

Human Anatomy and Physiology

Homeostatic mechanisms of the human body with emphasis on structure and function are studied.  Gross and microscopic structures are correlated with function of cells, tissues, organs and systems of the body.  Major topics include: skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.  Three hours of lecture per week.  Co-requisite: Bio 117  

BIO 108 (3 credits)

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Emphasis is on structure and function of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems.  Gross and microscopic structures are correlated with functions of cells, tissues, organs and systems of the body.  Three hours of lecture per week.  Co-requisite: Bio 118  

BIO 109 (3 credits)

Human Biology

An introductory course with emphasis on human physiology and the role humans play in biosphere. Applications of biological principles to practical human concerns are covered in one semester. Integrates laboratory and classroom work.

BIO 115 (3 credits)

Human Form and Function

A three-credit survey course in human anatomy and physiology directed towards Biology/Secondary Education and Forensic Science majors.

BIO 116 (1 credits)

Human Form and Function Laboratory

A one semester survey of human anatomy and physiology. Discusses all the major organ systems with an emphasis on structure and function. Required for Biochemistry, Forensic Science, and Biology-Secondary Education students. Available as an elective for Biology majors.

BIO 117 (1 credits)

Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

Experimental approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology is used to reinforce lecture concepts.  The exercises present the core elements of the subject matter in a hands-on manner.  The labs are presented in the same time period the material is being discussed in lecture.  One 2-hour lab per week. Co-requisite: Bio 107

BIO 118 (1 credit)

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

Experimental approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology is used to reinforce lecture concepts.  The exercises present the core elements of the subject matter in a hands-on manner.  The labs are presented in the same time period the material is being discussed in lecture.  One 2-hour lab per week. Co-requisite: Bio 108

BIO 203 (3 credits)

Environmental Issues

Study of humanity and its environment. Material may be drawn from various disciplines but includes ecological principles, energy resources, population dynamics and pollution. Specific considerations are given to human alteration of the environment. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 203 and CHE 203. Integrates laboratory and classroom work.

BIO 205 (4 credits)

Botany

Plant anatomy and vital physiological processes are examined. Water regulation, metabolism, growth and reproduction are covered, along with a pylogenetic survey of the major plant groups.  The importance of plants in the scheme of global ecology is considered. Integrates laboratory and classroom work. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or permission of instructor.

BIO 208 (3 credits)

Neuroscience for Rehabilitation

Examine structure and functioning of the human nervous system through an integrated analysis of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropsychology. Emphasizes clinically relevant neuroscience concepts, focusing on application to patient rehabilitation and therapeutic approaches. Prerequisites: BIO 107/117, 108/118 or BIO 103, 104.

BIO 211 (4 credits)

Kinesiology

Study of interaction between muscular and skeletal systems to produce human movement. Student reviews the anatomy and physiology of muscular system and learns the biomechanical influence it has on skeletal system in order to affect joint movement. A study of normal gait and upright posture is also included. Three hours lecture and two hours lab weekly. Prerequisite: BIO 107/117 with a “C” grade.

BIO 216 (3 credits)

Nutrition

Overview of nutritional requirements of individuals in the healthful state as well as modification of those requirements during illness. Prerequisities: BIO 107/117, 108/118, or permission of instructor.

BIO 220 (4 credits)

Clinical Microbiology

Study of the morphological and physiological nature of microorganisms and their relationship to humans in both the normal and deceased states. Emphasis on bacteriological techniques such as cultivation, staining, identification, and other techniques important in a clinical setting. Integrates laboratory and classroom work.

BIO 221 (4 credits)

General Microbiology

An integrated laboratory and classroom course which looks at both the morphological as well as the physiological nature of microorganisms and their relationship to both the normal and the deceased state in humans. Bacteriological techniques such as staining, identification and cultivation are emphasized. This course is limited to science majors, biology minors and biology secondary education majors, or with permission of instructor. Prerequisites: any one of the following BIO 103, 104, 107/117, or permission of instructor.

BIO 303 (3 credits)

Genetics

Introduction to classical and modern genetics. Topics include Mendel’s principles of heredity, chromosomal aberrations, protein synthesis, population genetics and regulation of gene action. Three hours of lecture per semester week. Prerequisites: BIO 104 or instructor permission.

BIO 304 (3 credits)

Cell Biology

Biological reactions at the cellular level. Modern trends in physiology with emphasis on the chemical and physical properties of cells. Colloidal properties and chemical composition of protoplasm, nucleic acids, cellular metabolism, enzymes, energy utilization, photosynthesis and cell processes are stressed. Three hours of lecture per semester week. Prerequisites: BIO 104; CHE 105, 202.

BIO 309 (1 credit)

Molecular Genetics Laboratory

Introduction to the basic methods and techniques employed in a modern genetics or biotechnology laboratory. Students will experiment with DNA amplification, electrophoretic separation, cloning and other recombinant DNA technologies. Co-requisite for Biology and Biochemistry majors enrolled in BIO 303 Genetics.

BIO 311 (1 credit)

Cellular Physiology Labratory

Introduction to the laboratory methods and techniques employed in the study of microscopic organisms, individual cells and cellular tissues. Students will experiment with in vitro cell growth and culture techniques, cellular metabolism as well as DNA and protein biosynthesis. Co-requisite for Biology and Biochemistry majors enrolled in BIO 304 Cell Biology.

BIO 315 (3 credits)

Forensic Medicine

Provides an understanding of the basic scientific, ethical and legal principles that are relevant to the practice of forensic medicine. Students will be exposed to post-mortem examination including issues related to dealing with bereaved relatives of a deceased person or victim of crime. An understanding of basic human anatomy and physiology is expected. Graphic photos and/or attendance at a forensic autopsy will be included. Prerequisites: BIO 115 and 116.

BIO 316 (2 credits)

Introduction to Biology Research

First of three courses in the student research sequence. An introduction to investigative and/or synthetic research in biology. The course will focus on literature review in a selected area of interest and development of a rational hypothesis and research proposal. Students will be introduced to research methods and procedures, be exposed to ongoing research projects and be expected to select a research mentor. Prerequisite: junior status.

BIO 317 (2 credits)

Experimentation in Biology Research

Second of three courses in the student research sequence. Students will continue studies in a guided research project under the direction of a selected research mentor. Students will advance their research projects through weekly laboratory or field activities. The focus will be on designing and conducting experiments as well as evaluating and interpreting experimental results. Prerequisites: BIO 316 and junior status.

BIO 320 (4 credits)

Ecology        

This 4-credit lecture/laboratory course examines the ecological and evolutionary basis of natural systems from a hierarchical perspective.  The major topics covered include: population and community ecology, interactions in communities, and ecosystem functions.  Prerequisites: BIO 103, 104 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 330 (2 credits)

Biotechnology        

Introduces the student to some of the basic and classical research techniques that are used in the biological sciences and familiarizes them with some of the equipment that is routinely used.  Prerequisites: BIO 103, 104 or 115; CHE 104, 105, 201 or permission of the instructor. 

BIO 402 (2 credits)

Seminar

Students research a topic, including review of the literature, and then prepare a paper for presentation.

BIO 405 (3 credits)

Pharmacology

Major concepts center around the physiological actions of drugs. Topics to be covered include the survey of major classes of drugs used in clinical therapeutics; prototype drugs developed for selected purposes; toxic interactions; and the physiological mechanism by which drugs produce their effects. Three hours of lecture per semester week. Prerequisites: 6 credits of biology or permission of instructor.

BIO 407 (3 credits)

Data Analysis in Biology Research

This third and final course in the student research sequence focuses on the interpretation and dissemination of data compiled during investigative studies in laboratory or field biology. Students will complete any final experimentation and wrap-up their research project. Students will work to formulate conclusions and output their data in a presentable research format. The focus will be on preparation of a formal oral presentation, poster presentation or research article. Prerequisites: BIO 317 and Senior status.

BIO 409 (3 credits)

Immunology

Introduction to fundamental concepts of immune response. Principles relating to clinical immunology are discussed in terms of underlying experimental studies. Immunologic reactions and ideas on the function of the immune system are explained. Three hours of lecture per semester week. Prerequisites: BIO 104, 304, and CHE 105, or permission of instructor.

BIO 410 (3 credits)

Pathophysiology

Effects of internal and external stressors on body functions are examined.  Normal human physiological principles and homeostatic mechanisms are reviewed. Genetic and nutritional aspects are integrated into the discussion of disease. Three hours of lecture per semester week. Prerequisites: BIO 107/117, 108/118 or permission of instructor.

BIO 480 (6 credits)

Biology Internship

Student must participate in 200 hours or more of biology-related activities at an off-campus site under the supervision of an internship sponsor. Internships may be procured at any business, academic, government or non-profit agency willing to engage interns in meaningful work or research activities. Prerequisites: junior status and a 2.5 GPA.

Contact Information

Rosemarie C. Chinni, Ph.D.
Science & Mathematics Department Chair

     Bernardine Hall 3208
     610.568.1492
     rosemarie.chinni@alvernia.edu

Student Perspective

"In chemistry, it's all about your lab technique. At Alvernia I learned how to do chemistry, correctly and efficiently. I learned to work at a quick pace and think ahead." -Jason Betz '08, Adpen Laboratories, Jacksonville, FL